Tornadoes and Storms hit Central USA, 26 Apr 16

A vigorous storm brought tornadoes and massive hail stones the central USA yesterday, 26 Apr 16.

Cloud top pressure, courtesy of EOSDIS, computed from satellite imagery shows pressure of highest cloud visible to the sensor; the lower the pressure the higher the cloud.

Desktop meteorologists can get a quick view of the tornadoes and convective storms that hit central USA yesterday, 26 Apr 16, by using NASA’s EOSDIS presented as the featured image to this blog.  The purple mass in the top right hand area of the picture is very high cloud associated with this active storm system.

Visual imagery is presented below.

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EOSDIS Satellite 26 Apr 16

A look at the wind flow at 250 mb /30,000ft ish, using the Earth website, shows the region overlain by the exit of a powerful jet stream.  Mathematical dynamics predict this to be aan area of strong divergence the result of which being the air is literally sucked up through the atmosphere from the surface causing these vigorous storms.

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250mb flow 26 Apr 16

Airbourne Desert Sands Mark Out Cold Front in Eastern Mediterranean

desert sands blow out of Africa on a conveyor belt of air ahead of a cold front

 

 

Cold fronts are normally identifiable from their cloud signature on satellite imagery.  Of course, air mass boundaries can exist without condensation: density changes and air flows can exist without clouds particularly in dry and hot air.  Summer front can cross the UK with just low strato-cumulus.  In the Mediterranean, cloudless density boundaries one day give potential for fierce thunderstorms the next.

The 23 Mar 2016 was a case in point.  Over the Eastern Mediterranean we note a conveyor belt of air dragging sand northwards from the African deserts.  No clouds but a cold front none the less.